Last edited by Mutaur
Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

4 edition of Carcinoids of the gastrointestinal tract found in the catalog.

Carcinoids of the gastrointestinal tract

by Richard J. Sanders

  • 273 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Thomas in Springfield, Ill .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Gastrointestinal system -- Tumors.,
  • Carcinoid.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    Statementby Richard J. Sanders.
    SeriesAmerican lecture series, publication no. 884. A publication in the Bannerstone Division of American lectures in living chemistry
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC280.A4 S26
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 133 p.
    Number of Pages133
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5309428M
    ISBN 10039802779X
    LC Control Number72093228

    Incidences ranging from % to % have been reported. Between and , twenty-four cases of carcinoids of the gastrointestinal tract were encountered at the Ochsner Clinic. In addition, there was one carcinoid of the appendix seen in Our experience with these 25 cases will be reviewed and the literature on carcinoids discussed. A carcinoid (also carcinoid tumor) is a slow-growing type of neuroendocrine tumor originating in the cells of the neuroendocrine system. In some cases, metastasis may occur. Carcinoid tumors of the midgut (jejunum, ileum, appendix, and cecum) are associated with carcinoid syndrome.

    Carcinoid tumors are a type of neuroendocrine tumor that can occur along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The small intestine is the most common location for GI carcinoid tumors to develop – approximately 40% of all GI carcinoids originate in the small bowel. Signs of a small intestine carcinoid tumor. Gastrointestinal carcinoids are a biologically heterogeneous group of tumors, with variable clinical presentation and biologic behavior. Imaging can play an impor - tant role in multidisciplinary identification and management of this disease.

    Certain foods or eating habits are more likely to result in flushing, diarrhea, gas, bloating, and abdominal pain related to carcinoid syndrome. About two-thirds of carcinoid tumors are found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, one-fourth in the bronchopulmonary tree, and the remainder in the urogenital tract. Presentation, behavior, and malignant potential of carcinoid tumors are determined by the site at which they originate.


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Carcinoids of the gastrointestinal tract by Richard J. Sanders Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Sanders, Richard J. Carcinoids of the gastrointestinal tract. Springfield, Ill., Thomas Carcinoids of the gastrointestinal tract book (OCoLC)   Carcinoids of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

The author states in his preface that this book was designed to be a review of essentially all the laboratory and clinical aspects of gastrointestinal tract tumors. He writes in a style that permits quick and easy reading and provides a good overview of the subject for one not familiar with this field.

gastrointestinal tract, carcinoids are considered to be endodermal in origin (4), al-though previously some believed that they were derived from the neural crest.

Gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoids, considered to be endocrine neoplasms with relatively low levels of malignancy, have never been examined in large, statistically reliable series to determine their true aggressive behavior in the early stage of both minute (≤ 5 mm) or small (– mm) tumors at a depth of invasion restricted to the mucosa and submucosa (sm carcinoids).Cited by:   Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract and account for approximately –3% of all intestinal cancers.

GISTs were first described by Mazur and Clark, who used electron microscopy to differentiate these tumors from other soft tissue sarcomas [ 48 ].Author: David J.

Maron. Background: Gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoids, considered to be endocrine neoplasms with relatively low levels of malignancy, have never been examined in large, statistically reliable series to determine their true aggressive behavior in the early stage of both minute (carcinoids).

Intestinal endocrine cells are scattered in the mucosa between gut mucosal cells at the base of crypts, but they can be found higher in the crypt. The enterochromaffin (EC) cells, the prototype for this cell, are the largest endocrine cell population in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and are characterized by fine red basal (subnuclear) granules.

Carcinoids occur most commonly in the appendix, jejunoileum, and rectum. Those smaller than 1 cm in diameter provide evidence of malignant potential only occasionally; lesions in the cm range do this quite variably, and tumors 2 cm and larger are almost always invasive or metastatic or both.

Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing tumors. Some may be functional neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the gastrointestinal system, lungs, or thymus and release hormones or vasoactive substances. These factors cause clinical syndromes characterized by flushing and diarrhea (gastrointestinal) or wheezing and right heart effects (bronchopulmonary).

Carcinoid syndromes. Carcinoid tumors can make a hormone called gastrin that signals the stomach to make acid. Too much gastrin can cause Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, in which the stomach makes too much acid.

High acid levels can lead to irritation of the lining of the stomach and even stomach ulcers, which can cause pain, nausea, and loss of appetite. The coating of barium helps show abnormalities of the lining of these organs. Barium studies can be used to examine the upper or lower parts of the digestive system.

This type of study is often useful in diagnosing some GI carcinoid tumors, but is least effective in finding those in the small intestine. The charts of patients with gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors diagnosed over a year period at 2 hospitals are reviewed and the clinical and pathological aspects discussed.

Carcinoids occur most commonly in the appendix, jejunoileum, and rectum. Those smaller than 1 cm in diameter provide evidence of malignant. The Gastrointestinal (Digestive) System The digestive system processes food for energy and rids the body of solid waste.

After food is chewed and swallowed, it enters the esophagus, a tube-shaped organ that carries food to the stomach through the neck and chest. The esophagus joins the stomach just beneath the diaphragm. Approximately 60–70% of carcinoids occur in the gastrointestinal tract and the second most common site is the tracheobronchial tree [ 3 ].

The incidence and prevalence of carcinoid tumors within the various subsites of the gastrointestinal tract have changed significantly in the past decade. Carcinoid tumours of the gallbladder are rare neoplasms of the diffuse endocrine cell system that represent digestive tract carcinoids.

Patients are usually young or middle-aged adults. They are more common in women than men. Small carcinoids (gallbladder are usually incidental findings in cholecystectomy specimens.

A carcinoid tumor is a type of neuroendocrine tumor that usually develops in the digestive (GI) tract (such as the stomach or intestines) or in the lungs. In some cases, a carcinoid tumor develops in another part of the body, such as the pancreas, testicle (in men), or ovary (in women).

Carcinoids are tumors of neuroendocrine cells that derive from endoderm (i.e., the embryologic layer that gives rise to the epithelium of the lung and gastrointestinal tract). From: Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease, Related terms: Adenocarcinoma; Neoplasm; Carcinoid Syndrome; Metastatic Carcinoma; Lesion; Protein; Mutation.

Carcinoids are tumors of the diffuse endocrine system. They occur most frequently in the gastrointestinal tract. Although they are considered malignant, their biologic behavior varies.

The radiologic and pathologic appearances of gastric, duodenal, ileal, appendiceal, and rectal carcinoids Cited by: survival for carcinoids of the appendix is 98%, gastric (types I/II) is 81%, rectum is 87%, small intestinal is 60%, colonic carcinoids is 62%, and gastric type III/IV is 33%.

T his review provides a broad outline of progress that has been made in the elucidation of the biology and management of gastrointestinal (GI) car-cinoid tumors. The clinical features of GI carcinoids vary according to anatomical location and cell type. [ 5, 12, 24] Most carcinoids in the GI tract are located within 3 feet (~90 cm) of.

Epidemiology. Small bowel carcinoid tumors account for ~40% of gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors Clinical presentation. Small bowel carcinoids are slow .Results: Patients with colorectal carcinoids had an increased rate of cancer in the colon and rectum (P tract (P = ), and prostate (P of the gastrointestinal tract cancers were.Most carcinoid tumors start in one of two areas: your lungs or your digestive system, also known as the GI tract.

That includes places like your stomach, small intestine, colon, appendix, or rectum.