Last edited by Akinokinos
Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of Syrian goddess (De dea Syria) found in the catalog.

Syrian goddess (De dea Syria)

Lucian of Samosata

Syrian goddess (De dea Syria)

by Lucian of Samosata

  • 151 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Published by Scholars Press for The Society of Biblical Literature in Missoula, Mont .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cults -- Syria -- Hierapolis (Extinct city),
  • Hierapolis (Syria : Extinct city) -- Religion.

  • Edition Notes

    English and Greek.

    Statementattributed to Lucian by Harold W. Attridge and Robert A. Oden.
    Series"Society of Biblical Literature. Graeco-Roman religion series -- 1.", Graeco-Roman religion series -- 1.
    ContributionsAttridge, Harold W., Oden, Robert A.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination61 p. --
    Number of Pages61
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14575510M

    The Syrian Goddess, by Lucian, tr. by Herbert A. Strong and John Garstang, [], at p. p. The following advertisement appeared at the end of The Syrian Goddess.   "Lucian of Samosata's De Dea Syria, (the Syrian Goddess) is one of the most 'notorious' classical writings. Not only does it acknowledge that at one time a paramount Goddess was worshipped in regions of the Ancient Near East, it goes into details of the practices of her devotees which later generations considered : Appspublisher.

    The Order of the White Moon Goddess Gallery Presents Atargatis A Level II Final Project by Adept Angela Riversong for The Sacred Three Goddess School (© All original material in this Project is under copyright protection and is the intellectual property of the author.). Fertility goddess. Astoreth equates with the Syrian goddess ASTARTE, both being modeled on the Mesopotamian ISTAR. She was adopted, typically, as goddess of both love and war. She is usually depicted wearing a horned headdress.

    The Diana of Ephesus was like the Syrian goddess Ashtoreth, and appears to have been worshipped with impure rites and magical mysteries, Acts Her image, fabled to have fallen down from Jupiter in heaven, seems to have been a block of wood tapering to the foot, with a female bust above covered with many breasts, the head crowned with.   Editorial Reviews. 06/10/ Lefteri (A Watermelon, a Fish and a Bible) tells a haunting and resonant story of Syrian war refugees undertaking a treacherous journey to possible , Nuri Ibrahim and his wife, Afra, who was blinded in an incident during the Syrian civil war, cling to their home while everyone else flees the bombings and violence/5(42).


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Syrian goddess (De dea Syria) by Lucian of Samosata Download PDF EPUB FB2

Book Description: "Lucian of Samosata's De Dea Syria, (the Syrian Goddess) is one of the most 'notorious' classical writings. Not only does it acknowledge that at one time a paramount Goddess was worshipped in regions of the Ancient Near East, it goes into details of the practices of her devotees which later generations considered reprehensible.3/5(2).

Lucian of Samosata's De Dea Syria, (the Syrian Goddess) is one of the most 'notorious' classical writings. Not only does it acknowledge that at one time a paramount Goddess was worshipped in regions of the Ancient Near East, it goes into details of the practices of her devotees which later generations considered reprehensible/5(2).

The Syrian Goddess: Being a Translation of Lucian's de Dea Syria, with a Life of Lucian (Illustrated Edition) (Dodo Press) Paperback – Janu /5(3). The Syrian Goddess: De Dea Syria Paperback – by Lucian (Author), Herbert A.

Strong (Translator), John Garstang (Introduction) & 0 more See all 5 /5(3). On the Syrian Goddess is a great text for intermediate readers.

The simple sentence structure and straightforward presentation make it easy and enjoyable to read, while its subject matter, the cult and sanctuary of Atargatis in Hierapolis, is interesting at many levels.5/5(3).

Lucian of Samosata's De Dea Syria, (the Syrian Goddess) is one of the most 'notorious' classical writings. Not only does it acknowledge that at one time a paramount Goddess was worshipped in regions of the Ancient Near East, it goes into details of the practices of her devotees which later generations considered reprehensible.

This is the first detailed study of an eyewitness account (attributed to Lucian of Samosata) of the Holy City of Hierapolis in northern Syria. This text, which is presented both in the original Greek and in translation, is one of the most important literary sources for a 4/5(1).

Buy this Book at The Syrian Goddess, by Lucian, tr. by Herbert A. Strong and John Garstang, [], at p. TRANSLATION AND NOTES. There is in Syria a city not far from the river Euphrates 1: it is called "the Sacred City," and is sacred to the Assyrian Hera.

The Syrian Goddess; Being a translation of Lucian's “De Dea Syria” with a Life of Lucian. By Prof. Strong. Edited with notes and an introduction by Dr. Garstang. About the Book De Dea Syria (Greek: Περὶ τῆς Συρίης Θεοῦ, "Concerning the Syrian Goddess") is the conventional Latin title of a Greek treatise of the 2nd century AD, which describes religious cults practiced at the temple of Hierapolis Bambyce, now Manbij, in Syria.

Lucian's treatise On the Syrian Goddess is a detailed description of the cult of the Syrian goddess Atargatis at Hierapolis. It is written in a faux-Ionic dialect and imitates the ethnographic methodology of the Greek historian Herodotus, which Lucian elsewhere derides as : c.

AD, Samosata, Roman Empire (modern-day. Atargatis / ə ˈ t ɑːr ɡ ə t ɪ s / or Ataratheh (/ ə ˈ t ær ə θ ə /; Aramaic: 'Atar'atheh or Tar'atheh) was the chief goddess of northern Syria in Classical antiquity. Ctesias also used the name Derketo (Ancient Greek: Δερκετὼ) for her, and the Romans called her Dea Syria, or in one word Deasura.

Primarily she was a goddess of fertility, but, as the baalat ("mistress") of. De Dea Syria (Concerning the Syrian Goddess) is the title of a work, written in a Herodotean-style of Ionic Greek, which has been traditionally ascribed to the Hellenized Syrian essayist Lucian of Samosata. It is a description of the various religious 4/5.

According to Salzman in "On Roman Time" it was not uncommon for ancient Romans to consider Kybele/Cybele and the Dea Syria as the one Goddess (ie, Magna Mater).

Though I noticed Apuleius referred to the "Syrian Goddess" I just assumed, because of the nature of her cult, she was one and the same as Cybele. Thank you for emphasising the difference.

The Syrian Goddess, by Lucian, tr. by Herbert A. Strong and John Garstang, [], full text etext at The Syrian Goddess: Being a Translation of Lucian's De Dea Syria, With a Life of Lucian (Illustrated Edition) (Dodo Press) Lucian, John Garstang (Editor), Herbert A.

Perhaps it was in response to Greek writers mythologising her to the point where she was described as the founder of Babylon, daughter of the Syrian goddess Derketo, and married to Ninus (the legendary founder of Nineveh, according to Greek authors).

Book 3 relates the history of Babylon from Nabonassar to Antiochus I (presumably). Again, it is. Lucian: On the Syrian Goddess J.L. Lightfoot (ed., trans.) This is the first detailed study of an eyewitness account (attributed to Lucian of Samosata) of the Holy City of Hierapolis in northern Syria.

The Syrian goddess; being a translation of Lucian's De dea Syria, with a life of Lucian by Herbert A. Strong. Edited with notes and an introd. by John Garstang by Lucian, of Samosata; Strong, Herbert Augustus, ; Garstang, John, Pages:   The Paperback of the The Syrian Goddess: de Dea Syria (Aziloth Books) by Lucian Of Samosata at Barnes & Noble.

FREE Shipping on $35 or more. Due to COVID, orders may be :. Lucian of Samosata's De Dea Syria, (the Syrian Goddess) is one of the most 'notorious' classical writings. Not only does it acknowledge that at one time a paramount Goddess was worshipped in regions of the Ancient Near East, it goes into details of the practices of her .Book 11 Lucius wakes up, afraid, but becomes aware of the goddess and the role she plays in his life.

He begins to think Fortune is changing her tune, and begins to pray to the goddess, addressing her various personas, such as Juno, Venus, Ceres, Phoebus’s sister, and g: Syrian goddess.Book 8 A young man comes to the grooms and herdsmen and tells them the sad news that Charite and her husband are dead.

He begins the story of how this came to pass by telling them about Thrasyllus, one of Charite’s suitors who planned a secret revenge against her after being spurned.