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Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of use of sampling in archaeological survey found in the catalog.

use of sampling in archaeological survey

James W. Mueller

use of sampling in archaeological survey

by James W. Mueller

  • 219 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Society for American Archaeology] in [Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Paria Plateau, Ariz.,
  • Arizona
    • Subjects:
    • Archaeological surveying.,
    • Archaeology -- Methodology.,
    • Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Antiquities.,
    • Paria Plateau, Ariz. -- Antiquities.

    • Edition Notes

      Other titlesAmerican antiquity.
      StatementJames W. Mueller.
      SeriesMemoirs of the Society for American Archaeology ; no. 28, Memoirs of the Society for American Archaeology ;, no. 28.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE51 .S7 no. 28, CC76.3 .S7 no. 28
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 91 p. :
      Number of Pages91
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4589951M
      LC Control Number77352046

      In a probability sample, all persons in the target population have a change of being selected for the survey sample and we know what that chance is. For example, in a telephone survey based on random digit dialing (RDD) sampling, researchers know the chance or probability that a particular telephone number will be selected. Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Using R is the first hands-on guide to using the R statistical computing system written specifically for archaeologists. It shows how to use the system to analyze many types of archaeological data.

      The essence of survey method can be explained as “questioning individuals on a topic or topics and then describing their responses”.In business studies survey method of primary data collection is used in order to test concepts, reflect attitude of people, establish the level of customer satisfaction, conduct segmentation research and a set of other purposes. problems with sampling, have relied on some type of stratification of the survey universe, typically incorporating samples of a full range of environ-mental zones with survey locations derived from known distributions of archaeological remains.T" Perhaps more disturbing is the fact that whereas archaeologists ask.

      SAMPLING METHODS IN ARCHAEOLOGY Notes SAMPLING IN SURVEY AND EXCAVATION: Complete survey or excavation: no sampling; you do total coverage Partial survey or excavation: you’re doing some kind of sampling even if it isn’t random. What kind of sample are you going to get? SAMPLING IN REGIONAL SURVEY: Is it a good way to find sites? Regional survey in Teotihuacan . Sampling was not widely used in the United States until passage of the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of This act, designed to protect the archaeological heritage of an area, has encouraged archaeological sampling of areas in which archaeological remains might exist that are in danger of being destroyed by construction or by the growth of cities.


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Use of sampling in archaeological survey by James W. Mueller Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Use of Sampling in Archaeological Survey (American Antiquity: Journal of the Society for American Archaeology No. 28) [James W Mueller] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Journal of the Society of American Archaeology.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Mueller, James W. Use of sampling in archaeological survey. [Washington: Society for American Archaeology],   No archaeologist should be without this book, which describes in simple, sensible language just exactly what is involved in the proper sampling of archaeological populations.

Sampling design and sample size receive excellent treatment, and the book describes the very useful adaptive sampling, a method with which few archaeologists are very Cited by: James W.

Mueller, The Use of Sampling in Archaeological Survey, Memoirs of the Society for American Archaeology, No. 28, The Use of Sampling in Archaeological Survey (), pp. i-xi,   The main purpose of this book is to fill this gap.

In addition, most archaeologists have been reluctant to discuss aspects of survey other than sampling and a few of the factors that influence detection probability.

They have also almost completely ignored the large body of literature on search theory that cognate fields have generated. Explain to students that in order to use an archaeological setting to demonstrate the use of statistical sampling, it will be assumed that a site will be sampled probabilistically.

Further, it will be assumed that the excavation units are test-pits. Design and Implement a Plan to Collect the Data. Sampling is a strategy that an archaeologist uses to investigate a region, site, or set of artifacts. A proper strategy allows her to gain a critical understanding of her data while preserving a subset for future research.

Sampling strategies need to. Sample surveys are used to obtain information about a large population by exam- ining only a small fraction of that population. Sampling techniques have been used in many fields, such as the following: •Governments survey human populations; for example, the U.S.

government con- ducts health surveys and census surveys. [Raj, p4] The surveyor’s (a person or a establishment in charge of collecting and recording data) or researchers initial task is to formulate a rational justification for the use of sampling in his research.

1 WHY WRITE REPORTS. To fulfil a planning requirement (commercial project). To make the results of your work/research accessible to others. To place your results within a wider archaeological and historical context.

When you submit your report to the Cambridgeshire Historic Environment Record (CHER), the information within it will be added to the HER database, which in turn will add to the. Sampling is a valid and respectable archaeological concept.

Statistical sampling theory occupies a central position in the discipline. This chapter discusses fundamentals and issues relating to how different statistical procedures function and focuses on the statistics of sampling.

strategies can be classified as either non-probabilistic or probabilistic. Non-probabilistic sampling is used when the archaeologist is most interested in already visible or suspected sites and does not need to sample elsewhere.

Probabilistic sampling is used when it is necessary to have a representative. Probabilistic sampling refers to the selection of the part of the archaeological record to be investigated in such a way that the probability theory can be used to evaluate the inferences made from that part to the whole from which it was selected, in terms of the probability that the inferences are correct.

Sampling in Archaeology C. ORTON, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press xii + pp., £ ISBN 0 5 As noted in this book much of archaeol-ogy involves sampling. Statistical sampling theory as applied to archaeological prob-lems attracted much attention from the s to the s, but it has been less dis-cussed since, and this is the first overview for archaeologists for.

There is a focus on sample percentage, when actually the number of sample units is more relevant for reducing standard error in statistical sampling. Despite a few oversights, this book has a great deal of practical advice about archeological surveying that has many applications.

Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA) Conclusion. The key to good research design is not to copy someone else’s idea of research, but to anticipate the kinds of data that are likely to help you resolve a particular research question, or evaluate a particular hypothesis, and then use or develop methods.

archaeological finds and are relatively non-destructive, but are labor-intensive, and therefore expensive. In order to use an archaeological setting to demonstrate the use of statistical sampling, we will assume that a site will be sampled probabilistically.

Further, we. Archaeologists use a variety of methods to find and/or test sites. Three basic strategies are often used, Systematic Sampling, Random Sampling, and Judgmental Sampling. When archaeologists are working in areas which have not been previously explored, they must decide how best to determine if the area contains an artifacts or sites.

According to Orton (), the idea of using probabilistic sampling methods explicitly in archaeological survey is usually attributed to Binford (). Binford stressed the idea of the region (a collection of sites) as a natural unit of archaeological study, and, admitting the impossibility of total coverage at this scale, advocated probabilistic sampling techniques as the way of achieving.

With stratified random sampling you take a sample that consists of items selected by chance from predefined groups in the population. This is done to make sure that you include all already known groups within the population in your sample.

Using cases and examples to illustrate sampling principles and procedures, the book thoroughly covers the fundamentals of modern survey sampling, and addresses recent changes in the survey environment such as declining response rates, the rise of Internet surveys, the need to accommodate cell phones in telephone surveys, and emerging uses of social media and big data.Some sequential designs use complicated cost-benefit relationships to optimize sample size (e.g., make an archaeological survey as inexpensive as possible while still ensuring as much precision as possible under the cost constraint) Summary of Research Design.

Identify research problems or hypotheses.In addition to using this sampling strategy for potentially stigmatized populations, it is also a useful strategy to use when the researcher’s group of interest is likely to be difficult to find, not only because of some stigma associated with the group, but also because the group may be relatively rare.